Rabindranath Tagore Story in English

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Rabindranath Tagore

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Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) was the youngest son of Debendranath Tagore, a leader of the Brahmo Samaj, a new religious sect in nineteenth-century Bengal that attempted to revive Hinduism’s last monistic basis, the Upanishads . He was educated at home; And although he was sent to England for formal schooling at the age of seventeen, he did not complete his studies there. In his mature years, in addition to his multifaceted literary activities, he managed the family estates, a project that brought him into closer contact with common humanity and increased his interest in social reform. He also started an experimental school at Shantiniketan where he tried his Upanishadic ideals of education. From time to time he participated in the Indian nationalist movement, though in his own non-sentimental and visionary manner; And Gandhi, the political father of modern India, was his devoted friend. Tagore was knighted by the ruling British government in 1915, but within a few years he resigned the honor in protest of British policies in India.

Tagore had early success as a writer in his native Bengal. He quickly became famous in the West with translations of some of his poems. Indeed his fame achieved a dazzling height, taking him across continents on lecture tours and friendship tours. He became the voice of India’s spiritual heritage to the world; And for India, especially for Bengal, he became a great living institution.

Rabindranath Tagore Education

Rabindra Nath Tagore had his early education at the Oriental Seminary School. But he did not like the traditional education and started studying under many teachers at home. He was mostly trained by his siblings in both literary as well as physical activities such as gymnastics and martial arts.

Tagore was a child prodigy when it came to writing as he started writing and publishing poetry at the age of eight.

In 1873, at the age of eleven, Tagore and his father left Calcutta to tour India for several months. He visited his father’s Shantiniketan estate and Amritsar, where he read biography, studied history, astronomy, modern science and Sanskrit, and examined the classical poetry of Kalidasa, before arriving at the Himalayan hill station of Dalhousie.

At the age of seventeen, he was sent to England for formal law schooling, but did not complete his studies there. Instead he took up the independent study of Shakespeare.

He returned from England in 1880 and regularly published poems, stories and novels in Bengali, gradually transforming Bengali literature.

In 1883, he married Mrinalini Devi, a child bride as per the tradition of the time.

Rabindranath Tagore in Santiniketan

Tagore moved to the Santiniketan ashram in 1901, where he started an experimental school based on traditional teacher-disciple teaching methods from the Upanishads. He hoped that the revival of ancient methods of teaching would be more beneficial than the modern education system provided by the British.

During this his wife and his two children died, leaving him in shock.

After his return from England and during his stay at Santiniketan, Tagore wrote several literary works of poetry, stories and novels. His works started getting immense popularity in India as well as abroad.

Rabindranath Tagore started writing Gitanjali in 1909. In 1912, Tagore went to Europe for the second time. During his visit to London, he translated some of his poems/songs from Gitanjali into English. He met William Rothenstein, a famous British painter in London, who, impressed with the poems, made copies and gave them to Yeats and other English poets. Yeats was enthralled and later wrote an introduction to Gitanjali when it was published in a limited edition by the India Society in London in September 1912. And in 1913 this collection of poems received the Nobel Prize in Literature. He was the first non-European to receive the prestigious award.

In 1915, he was awarded a knighthood by King George V.

Rabindranath Tagore in the freedom movement

Tagore participated in the Indian nationalist movement from time to time, though in his own non-sentimental and visionary manner; And Gandhi, the political father of modern India, was his devoted friend. Tagore came to be recognized as one of the architects of modern India.

India’s first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, wrote in Discovery of India, “Tagore and Gandhi have undoubtedly been two outstanding and influential figures in the first half of the twentieth century. Tagore continued to have a tremendous influence on the mind of India, and especially on the rising generations.” Not only Bangla, the language in which he wrote, but all the modern languages of India have been partly molded by his writings. More than any other Indian, he helped to harmonize the ideals of the East and the West and broadened the base of Indian nationalism.

In 1905, Viceroy Curzon decided to divide Bengal into two parts. Rabindranath Tagore strongly opposed this decision. Tagore wrote several national songs and participated in protest meetings. He introduced Rakhibandhan celebrations to symbolize the underlying unity of undivided Bengal.

In 1919, after the Jallianwala Bagh massacre, Tagore renounced his knighthood in condemnation of the act. He was a supporter of Gandhiji but he stayed away from politics. He was opposed to nationalism and militarism in principle, and instead promoted spiritual values and the creation of a new world culture founded in multi-culturalism, diversity, and tolerance.

Tagore the Educationalist

In 1921, Rabindranath Tagore founded the Visva-Bharati University and bequeathed all his Nobel Prize money and royalties from his books to this university.

Tagore was well versed in Western culture, especially Western poetry and science. Tagore had a good understanding of modern-Newtonian-post-physics and was able to hold his own in a debate with Einstein in 1930 on the newly emerging theories of quantum mechanics and chaos. His meetings and tape-recorded conversations with his contemporaries such as Albert Einstein and HG Wells are emblematic of his genius.

In 1940, the University of Oxford organized a special ceremony at Santiniketan and awarded the Doctorate of Literature to Rabindranath Tagore.

Tagore had early success as a writer in his native Bengal. He quickly became famous in the West with translations of some of his poems. Indeed his fame achieved a dazzling height, taking him across continents on lecture tours and friendship tours. He became the voice of India’s spiritual heritage to the world; And for India, especially for Bengal, he became a great living institution.

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Literary works of Rabindranath Tagore

Although Tagore wrote successfully in all literary genres, he was first and foremost a poet. Among his fifty and odd poetry collections are:

Manasi (1890) (The Ideal One), Sonar Tari (1894) (The Golden Boat), Gitanjali (1910) (Geet Prasad), Gitimalya (1914) (Garland of Songs), and Balka (1916) (Flight of the Cranes) ).

English translations of his poetry, including The Gardener (1913), Fruit-Gathering (1916) and The Fugitive (1921), generally do not correspond to particular editions in the original Bengali.

Tagore’s major plays are Raja (1910) [The King of the Dark Chamber], Dak Ghar (1912) [The Post Office], Achalayatan (1912) [The Immovable], Muktadhara (1922) [The Waterfall], and Raktakaravi (1926). ) [Red Oleander].

He is the author of several volumes of short stories and several novels, among them Gora (1910), Ghare-Bare (1916) [The Home and the World], and Yogayog (1929) [Crosscurrents].

In addition to these, he wrote musical plays, dance plays, essays of all kinds, travel diaries, and two autobiographies, one in his middle years and the other shortly before his death in 1941. Tagore also left many drawings and paintings and songs for which he himself wrote the music.

He also played the title role in his first original dramatic work – Valmiki Pratibha.

Legacy of Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore changed the way Bengali literature was viewed as he left a lasting impression on readers.

Many countries have statues of him installed and host several annual events to pay tribute to the great writer.

Many of his works have been globalized, due to the numerous translations by many renowned international authors.

There are five museums dedicated to Tagore. Of these, three are in India while the remaining two are in Bangladesh. His famous works are housed in museums, and are visited by millions of people every year.

Rabindranath Tagore died on August 7, 1941.

After an extended period of suffering, Tagore died on August 7, 1941, at the same mansion in which he had grown up.

Moral:- Most of the problems mentioned by Tagore about women in Indian society remain the same. So, reading these stories… you realize their timelessness.

Rabindranath Tagore

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